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Learn The Biggest Facebook Ad Mistakes Of Accounts Spending $20k A Month And Beyond With Logan Mayville | FSS07

Welcome to the Facebook Sales Secrets podcast with me, your host, Steven MacDonald, CEO of LeadKlozer. This podcast is dedicated to helping individuals or businesses achieve greater success through the power of Facebook. Listen in as we discuss everything about Facebook marketing, from ad campaigns to lead generation.

In today’s episode, I invited Logan Mayville, head of business development and marketing for Post Modern Marketing. Logan is a brilliant marketer and has created tried and true formulas to creating success through Facebook ads. With over 10 years of experience in Facebook ads, he brings us back to our fundamentals on this episode as we learn the secrets to the Biggest Facebook Ad Mistakes of Accounts Spending $20k a Month and Beyond.

Show Notes:

 

[3:09] The fundamentals of Facebook ad management.

 

[8:19] The anatomy of an effective advertisement.

 

[16:04] How to go about testing your ads.

 

[21:35] How long it takes to test ads on Facebook.

 

[23:36] Logan’s number one tip for all Facebook ad managers.

 

[25:41] Philosophy behind retargeting audiences with ads.

Transcript:

Intro

What you’re going to learn today is what agencies and what clients spending 20, 30, 40, $50,000 a month are not getting right, that is killing their ad performance.

 

As a small reminder to my incredible audience, please leave me a review and hit that subscribe button. Your support helps this podcast get into more ears. Thanks in advance.

 

You’re listening to the Facebook Sales Secrets podcast hosted by Steve MacDonald from LeadKlozer, where we interview digital agency owners on their insider secrets to the successes they create for their clients through the Facebook marketing ecosystem. Tune in for the cutting edge tips, tricks, nuances and tools that will take your Facebook campaigns to the next level. Now, here’s your host, Steve MacDonald.

 

Steven

Hey, everyone. Welcome to the Facebook Sales Secrets podcast. I’m Steve MacDonald, CEO and founder of LeadKlozer. And today I’m very proud to have a very special guest with us, Logan Mayville. Logan is head of business development and all of marketing for Post Modern Marketing, the ad agency. And you’re, I think, a certified Facebook ads planner. You’re knee-deep in it every single day. And you’ve spoken countless times on Facebook advertising. And you’ve got a real interesting perspective that we want to share here today that literally gets right down to what you called the fundamentals. But what agencies that are spending 10, 20, or clients that are spending $10,000 – $20,000 a month were doing completely wrong. So with that, I’ll turn it over to you. Tell us a little bit about yourself. And then let’s get into the topic here.

 

Logan

Yeah. Well, Steve, thanks for having me, first of all. And I can almost hear your audience’s rolling their eyes thinking that someone’s going to come on and talk the fundamentals. But I promise this is something that’s going to be good to know. Yeah, so quickly, a little bit about me, like I said, like you said, I run business development and marketing for a digital-first conversion oriented agency called PMM. We have offices in Sacramento, California and Lexington, Kentucky. And we specialize in lead generation for service-based businesses; anyone who wants to do real work on the internet, you know. And so before I started doing sales and marketing for PMM, I was an independent consultant specializing in Facebook ads. I’ve dabbled a bit with copywriting and content strategy, but basically have been, kind of been specializing in digital marketing the last 10 years or so.

 

Steven

Well, fantastic. And that’s absolutely led you over 10 years of trials, campaigns, and different things that you said you were surprised at how many mistakes that, you know, companies that were spending big dollars and the agency behind them weren’t really getting the most out of their, their campaigns.

 

Logan

Correct.

 

Steven

And that’s something that isn’t necessarily the sexy side, let’s get in and fix this. But boy, if you don’t, you’re leaving huge amounts of ROI on the table.

 

Logan

Yes, agreed. And it’s, it’s you can’t have, you can’t use a fancy tactic if you don’t have kind of the fundamentals in place. And so like you said, I’ve audited, you know, dozens or even maybe hundreds of ad accounts. And I’ve seen accounts, spending up to $50,000 a month who aren’t even covering these fundamentals, which I’m gonna explain next. And there’s a problem with performance. And then there’s also going to be a problem with reporting. And it should be very clear by the time I’m done explaining, but I guess first of all say is I call the framework that I’m about to use, the Facebook ads two-step, because it is essentially two steps. Now I use the word framework, as opposed to technique or strategy, because it’s, it’s, it’s not either of those things. I can tell you what you need to do this, like, so to speak. But you still need to fill in the blanks with your unique creative and your value propositions and things like that. So it’s a framework, but it is fairly step-by-step. So if you fill in the blanks, you will get where you need to go. And so step one of the Facebook ads two-step is prospecting. Step two is retargeting. So when I say prospecting, what I mean by that is, these are audiences that have never been exposed to your brand, they haven’t been to your website, they haven’t been to your Facebook page, or Instagram profile, they haven’t watched one of your videos. And you can know this for certain, for now, because you can use exclusion audiences. So when you create a prospecting campaign, you’re gonna want to exclude anyone who’s been to your site, watch your videos, etc. For the time being, that’s, it’s still possible, in some cases. There’s a couple different ways you can do that. Obviously, there’s interest targeting which everyone knows about with Facebook demographics, look-alikes, which use a database seed audience. But all of those are prospecting audiences. They’re cold, they’ve never seen your brand before, and so on. The first thing you got to think about as a marketer is, this is your first impression? You know, someone’s scrolling on their phone, what are you going to say? And so when you think about it, that’s actually pretty different than what you might say to someone who’s already been on your site, or has already watched your explainer video. And so this concept of dividing your brain into prospecting and retargeting is a good way to reach your consumer, kind of, where they’re at in their buying journey. Does that make sense to you?

 

Steven

Oh, yeah, absolutely. I mean, a cold audience, you know, we all want in the days in, you know, go back five, six years ago. It was very different on Facebook. Converting a cold audience was a lot easier. Right now taking an audience that’s never heard of you, doesn’t know you, doesn’t trust you, it’s the whole like, know, and trust thing, right. And so, you know, that audience, if we don’t treat it differently, that’s where most Facebook campaigns fail, that I’ve seen, because people are trying to trade, create a cold audience and treat it, like somebody who’s gonna get ready to buy. And that doesn’t work.

 

Logan

Yeah, okay, I mean, if you think about the, you know, we’ve kind of done the the funnel analogy to death. But I mean, this, if you’re solving a problem, or you’re trying to catch attention, it’s people aren’t really in buy mode, you know, on Facebook and social media. Now, they do buy, of course, but generally speaking, their frame of mind, they’re, they’re trying to entertain themselves, you know, they’re looking at pictures of people’s kids. It’s, it’s not a buy mode. So if you come off kind of like sales-breathy, like they’re gonna, it’s gonna smell like that right away. And so the crucial part is, I mean, just, again, back to the fundamentals, how are you going to catch someone’s attention and their interest. And so that’s what goes into, you know, your ad creative and things like that. But again, if, for anyone who has actually ever been in Facebook’s ads manager, there’s tiers to how your campaigns, ad sets, and ads are set up. And so if, for anyone who knows what the interface looks like, I gotta stress this enough, you should never have retargeting audiences combined with prospecting audiences, they should be totally separate. And so the first reason is, is performance base, right? If you’re, if you’re combining those two, you’re going to you’re, you’re going to suffer a little bit because you’re sending the wrong messages to the wrong people. And the second thing is tracking. If you’ve got a retargeting audience mixed in with your prospecting audience, and you’re getting results, you won’t know which is responsible for that, if you don’t have it organized properly. So when I go into all of these ad accounts, I’m pulling apart things, that it takes a long time, because sometimes they’re not labeled correctly. And so, a solid naming convention, separating your prospecting audiences into different campaigns than your retargeting audiences, is a great first step. And if you can get that done, you can evolve from there, and iterate, and continue to get better, which is kind of what the game is all about, right?

 

Steven

Absolutely. So you told me a little bit earlier, we had a conversation right before we hit the record button. And you you talked about, once you, you establish and you create the two different steps, but that there is very specifically a point of view that you have on the fundamentals of the anatomy of the actual ad itself. Tell us a little bit about that.

 

Logan

Yeah, so I call it the anatomy of a Facebook ad. Because what a lot of people don’t realize, until you explain is that there are there are three distinct different components of most ads, you know, different placements. But for now, I’m mostly going to be talking about the mobile placement, or the desktop placement, which gets the majority of action. So you’ve got your, your graphic or your video, you’ve got your headline, and you’ve got your post copy, which is kind of like the normal part of the post. And what’s what’s really going on is all three of those things are working in concert. And so when you think about like, writing creative, or designing creative for your Facebook ads, a lot of times it gets overlooked a little bit because you’ve done so many other things, you’ve made the website, you’ve done the offer, you’ve got the pixel all set up, and you kind of just throw whatever comes to mind out there, and it’s not like a real serious process. And I’m here to say that the creative is the most important thing. There’s just so many ads out there, so much distraction that that’s where you should focus the most of your time on. And so you got these three components to work with. And so each one should be carefully crafted. And so the easiest way to think about it and it to me, is the old sales adage, right? A-I-D-A attention, interest, desire, action. That’s the stage someone goes through to click a button or make a decision. In our case, it’s probably not a purchase decision. It’s probably more of a Hey, look, you know, decision. So, what are the, going back to those three things? Graphic or video, headline, and post copy. What the, what people don’t realize is what the graphic is actually supposed to do is stop the scroll, right? Because people are gonna know it’s an ad, probably before they’re even done seeing the whole thing, right? Because you can kind of tell there’s a little sponsored tag, we just kind of know how to operate in social media. So if you don’t stop the scroll, it doesn’t really matter what your offer is, or what your post copy says. Or if you use an emoji or not, right, you got to stop the scroll. And so the video I mean, let’s say if it is video, motion is a good thing, you know, someone walking, where they walk into, I don’t know, but I gotta watch the find out, right? Bright colors, not flashing colors, maybe, you need to give anyone a seizure here. But you don’t want to use light blue to wash out with Facebook’s interface, you don’t want to use gray, you don’t want to use something that screams I’m stock photography, because that’s going to turn people off too. So if you think about, you know, using the eyeball test, what is going to stop that scroll. And so motion, colors, those are ways to do it. Potentially, you can tastefully use some text overlays, as well. But again, got to think what’s the job? Stop the scroll. So if you’re using selling words, in your posts, in your on your graphic overlays, it’s not really the place for it. Now, if you stop the scroll, which is harder than it sounds, the next thing people are going to do is, their eyes will either dart up to the post copy, which resides above the graphic on Facebook and below it on Instagram. And then the headline, which is in the in on Facebook, it’s below in dark black letters. And so this is kind of when you’re going to build that interest and that desire. And so basically, what you need to be thinking as you’re writing this copy is, I’ve earned enough of this person’s attention for them to kind of skim my copy, what am I going to tell them that’s going to sort of tickle them, it’s going to run through ask a question, there’s loads of things you can try. At PMM we use, we use a framework for all of our ads. So all of our ads have themes for the copywriting, and that’s value, scarcity, and relationship. So no matter what, no matter which of our clients, you have, no matter which of our ads, that’s generally going to be a theme of one of the ads. And it’s just like, it’s just something for our, it’s a system that our copywriters can use to kind of stay on point. And it works.

 

Steven

When you talk about value and you’re talking about scarcity, you’re talking about relationship. These are all elements that go into the same one?

 

Logan

One or the other. One of each ad, it’s, the focus would be blended throughout those three different components, the headline, the graphic, and the post copy. So one or the other. And again, if you have your account organized correctly, you can stack those right next to each other. And you can see which one’s converting better. And I can’t stress enough how important it is to,

 

Steven

Is it of step one or step two in the framework? Or where does that come in?

 

Logan

It’s, I think it’s more important in the prospecting stage, the first stage. Because you haven’t earned their attention yet. Retargeting, I’m not gonna say you can be lazy at all with your copy because you can’t, there’s just, there’s too much competition out there. But you can move on towards more complex messages. You don’t want to have a complex message on your first touch, right? You want it to be one clear thought, don’t try to, because, so see, this is something that people don’t realize, your Facebook ad is not selling a product or service, you’re selling a click, think about that. Okay? Once the person is off your ad and onto your landing page, or opening up your lead gen form, or in your store, they’re not thinking about the ad anymore. They forgot about that 10 minutes ago, and it’s only been two seconds, right? So that’s where you have to let your landing pages work for you. Now, there’s some, you’re obviously, this is kind of not part of the talk I wanted to do today. But it’s important that there’s some congruency between your ad copy and your landing pages, you know, but point is sell the click, not the, not the thing itself, not the product, or the service. And so there’s a couple different ways to do that. Obviously, you can ask a question, there’s different techniques, but creating a curiosity gap is not a bad way to do it. Because what’s gonna give me the click is I want to know what’s on the other side of that, right now thinking like the kind like the BuzzFeed articles, you’re like, why am I reading this thing about cats on some Island in Japan? Well, I had to know, you know, the way it was posed.

 

Steven

That’s, that’s a good analogy. Okay.

 

Logan

Yeah, so I birdwalk a little off the topic. But point being, really focus on that Ad creative. Use a system, right? So if like, it’s not, you don’t want to put whatever comes to mind, wherever you think is going to be good. You want to sell that click, and you want to use kind of a framework. And so you know, and you’ve got to put them in, in your account in a very organized manner. Because what we do is you know, I name these different ad creatives, if they’re targeting the same audience, and the only thing that’s different about these ads is the theme, value here, scarcity there. I would love to see which one is doing better, right? Then I can either doubled down on that tactic, or I can try the video or image and just kind of continue my testing. So this is neither here nor there. But if you’re spending 3000, a month or more on ads, you’re going to be one of doing a test like this at least, probably, once a week. That gives you enough time to see like, Okay, this, I’ve got enough clicks to see that, you know, enough conversions to see that this ad is doing much better than that, people are responding to this message better, I’m gonna, I’m gonna zero in on the value thing and then maybe spin off of it, maybe I’ll ask a question, maybe I’ll use an emoji, that’s when you can start to get more advanced. That’s not where you start, though. Right? You start with the fundamentals, you start with organizing your account, making sure things tracking properly, and then using a proven framework. At least that’s that’s what I recommend.

 

Steven

So you talked about the three different levels, like the photo or the video, the headline, the text message. Now, obviously, those are three different variables in one ad. So how do you test which variable is working? Or which variable is?

 

Logan

Yeah. And so the simple answer is to try one thing at a time, right? So generally speaking, what I’m going to do is I’m going to use the exact same copy with a, with two different graphics. The graphic or the video is always the first thing I test because again, you can’t stop the scroll, doesn’t really matter what you did. So once I get a working, proven graphic, or a proven video, that’s when I’m gonna start iterating on those headlines and that post copy.

 

Steven

And so this is something that most of us have been doing Facebook advertising for a while, right? If you put up two or three different photos as an example, a lot of them, the one you throw in last, and you’re like, let’s just see what happens, is the one that works, right?

 

Logan

It is, overwhelmingly, it’s not the one I expect. I’ve been through it so many times. And I, you know, when you’re fighting with a client on sort of, can I use this ad creative or whatever? You just got to tell them, hey, you hate this one, that’ll probably be the best one, let’s see in a week. You know, make a bet with them or something. You’re exactly, you’re exactly right, though. It’s never the one you expect.

 

Steven

Now, do you ever use like dynamic creative to let Facebook kind of pick the right elements? Or do you like to have them in separate campaigns or ad sets? How do you do that?

 

Logan

So I actually, I actually was a proponent of dynamic creative over a year ago, and now I am not. And there’s, it’s funny, if any, any sort of Facebook practitioner, dynamic creative sounds amazing in theory, and I’ve had good results for it in certain cases. Other times, it just seems to be a extremely frustrating part of the algorithm that I don’t have any control over. And so I don’t, I don’t use it anymore. And it’s just, it’s purely based on experience. And so some some people,

 

Steven

In like, different ad sets that have different, like one answer that has like three different ads, can you just create three physical ads? Or how do you do that testing?

 

Logan

Correct, most of the, most of the separation is going to be done at the ad set and the ad level. I’ve used dynamic creative in the past, you know, done up to gosh, five by five by five permutations of five graphics, five headlines, five things and just kind of let it sort it all out. But I just, anecdotally, performance has not been as expected using that. So I basically quit using it all together, almost like probably, like almost a year ago. I don’t really know anyone who’s using it right now.

 

Steven

Oh, interesting. Okay. All right. So you work first, on the on the image? What’s your thought on image versus video?

 

Logan

Right. Um, I prefer video when you can get them, for a couple reasons. One is that you can, actually, several reasons. So one is that you can transmit so much more information. It has, it has voice or sound, it’s got images, and then you can do text overlays or and/or captions, right? So basically, there’s more happening. Now you have to be careful with that, of course, because you don’t want to come off looking like a jumble of stuff. But the fact that you can just transmit so much more is a good thing. Second, is that video watch percentage is a really good indicator of interest, right? So if let’s say I’ve got a minute long video, which, frankly on Instagram or Facebook is probably too long for a prospecting video, stick with that 15 second range. But let’s say someone you know, is watching 75% of a one minute video. That’s a very interested party, right? And so those are really good candidates for retargeting ads. And so after you run these, this video for a while, they’re building warm audiences that you can use later. So it’s kind of a double dip on the video. And then, but I’m not here to say that video strictly works better in terms of conversions, because it doesn’t and there’s, there to, it varies too much to say anything concrete like that. But if you, if you’re not sure, and you’re just getting started, or you’re always gonna want to test some sort of video. It doesn’t have to be necessarily super complex. So for a while I did a lot of ads for chiropractic. And I pretty much use the same formula, I would get, I would get the client to record themselves adjusting someone, you know, smiling personally, but it would, didn’t, it didn’t, it looked real, right? And then all I would do was kind of use some soothing music, and then put a very clear offer on to a text overlay and then then confirm that offer through the post copy. So it like, it wasn’t, you know, groundbreaking. But those videos constantly did better than any sort of headshot, or any sort of office photo that I could, that I could use.

 

Steven

That makes sense. And the bottom line is, what I’m hearing from you is, you got to prove that every time, right? And you’ve got to test. And that that’s the first, because knowing that there’s so many different variables, right? That you could just get overwhelmed and not know what to do by just what do I test first, right? So as long as you’ve got your structure set up, which I love, then you just go right after that image or video first. And then and then once you do that, then you do the same kind of a testing cycle on the text and the headline, is that right?

 

Logan

Absolutely.

 

Steven

And at the end, so how long of a process is this, right?

 

Logan

Yeah.

 

Steven

That probabily is the one you know, they want results, right? I gave you the money, the ad went up, right?

 

Logan

So here’s the here’s the weird thing about time as we know it in Facebook ads land. Time is relative to your budget, right? Small budget, need lots of time; huge budget contest in a day, or two days, or something like that. So it really depends. And so what I think and I tell people who are who are kicking the tires, on Facebook, Instagram ads that, at minimum set aside $3,000 a month in ad spend. Because otherwise, like if you’re at that 3000 mark, you’re probably gonna want to learn some techniques and to do it yourself. Because what you’re going to pay in fees to an expert is going to be you know, probably similar to your ad spend. It feels a little weird, doing your, your fee and your ad spend the same amount. But yeah, so that’s kind of like the level I would say, like dip a toe, make sure that you’ve got, you know, say two to three months of $3,000 per month to test some concepts. I would also say this has nothing to do with Facebook ads. But before you’re ready to dive in, make sure you have like a proven offer like, like don’t, I mean, unless you have budget to blow. But like the idea is this has worked in other channels, you know, it works organically, we have something that works through word-of-mouth is like it’s, ads don’t make or break the product, right? It has to work itself. So if you’re testing a brand new landing page, or a brand new ecommerce store with no traffic, just realize that you’re just introducing another variable which takes longer to test. So I’m kind of speaking from the point of view of advertising, something that works not that you’re creating something from scratch and your make or break is on Facebook ads, which I do not recommend.

 

Steven

Yeah, that makes that makes perfect sense. So throughout everything that we’ve discussed here, what is the number one thing that you, you, if you had something to recommend? What’s the number one thing that you would say, make sure you do this?

 

Logan

It’s funny, I really want to answer kind of humorously but I’ll, I’ll try to be, unfortunately, for the listeners who are looking for a growth hack, it is ad account organization. Simply because ad builds take a long time. And it’s, you got, there’s a lot of maneuvers you have to do in the Facebook ads manager. You have to look back, you know, months from now, on reporting. Organize your ad accounts into prospecting and retargeting. test different audiences within those. And it’s gonna make your life so much easier, especially if you work at an agency where you’re gonna be required to, you know, report on some of this stuff. Just having proper naming conventions for your organization. You know, put prospecting in the campaign name, you know, put the audience title in the ad set name, just things like that. If it’s a video, label it a video in your ad name, organize your account like that, and just kind of using that thinking, the Facebook ads two-step, I’m gonna hit him with this, I’m gonna hit him again with this, like, that’s kind of what it takes these days. So, but that all has to be done with proper organization, or else you’ll just kind of end up, you’re kind of flying by the seat of your pants if you don’t, which works sometimes, but,

 

Steven

Yeah, but we don’t want to rely on that, right?

 

Logan

That’s right.

 

Steven

Based on that answer, and then the whole discussion that we’ve had here, you know, the whole prospect and then retargeting ads. What is, what are your thoughts or, you know, a few minutes of wisdom. There’s so many retargeting options. You mentioned video views as one example, right? People go to your landing page. But Facebook gets finicky on custom audiences and look-alike audiences because they they want you to have like 1000 people in the audience. So you know retargeting is different on Facebook like say it is on on Google, right? So what, what’s your philosophy on the best retargeting audiences to try to create from the beginning?

 

Logan

So unfortunately, it depends. And what it depends on is, generally speaking, the size of your warm audiences you’re creating, and also your budget. So for instance, you got to kind of think of prospecting and retargeting almost like a snake eating its own tail, right? So these, these prospecting ads that you’re sending out there are actually creating your retargeting ads. And so, if there’s a couple of popular ones that I always use video watch percentage, Facebook or Instagram profile engagement, things like saving posts and stuff are great, and of course, website traffic. Now, if you’re spending 3000 bucks a month, you know, that’s creating so much activity, right? In terms of clicks, and engagement, and video watches, I would probably just jam all those together and almost treat them all the same. Because what you don’t want to have happen is to have say, $20 a day being spent on a retargeting audience with a tiny amount of people in it, because what’s going to happen is your frequency, which is the average amount of times one person has seen your ad is going to jump up above six really quickly. And so at that point, you’re going to start to create a negative association with your brand. This guy is spamming me, you’re gonna get comments on your ads, you’re gonna get people hiding your ads, you’re gonna get negative feedback on your ads, it’s going to decrease the performance. So under 3000, combine all your retargeting into one ad set, because frankly, you don’t have enough data to really, it, I’m trying to think how to put this, the point of diminishing returns, right? Yes, ideally, theoretically, it would be beneficial to separate out three different retargeting audiences and test, but you’re going to drive yourself crazy. And there’s not going to be that much benefit in you, for you for doing that. And so the larger you get, you want to try and do that. Also, it depends on sort of what you’re doing. So let’s say that you are, you have one offer that you run all year long, or it’s not an offer, it’s just full price, right? And you’re just selling on value. But then every six weeks or every eight weeks, you run a special like a promo, right? Something that like a godfather offer that everyone just has to have when they get it. Well, at that, if you have something like that, you might actually want to like, really zero in, you know, you might want to say like this page, or this blog post is a good audience primer for this person who’s going to accept this godfather offer. Or you might say, right now I’m just gonna, I’m gonna have a tiny little budget, and I’m gonna target people who have saved one of my posts, right? Because that’s it, if someone saves the post, and if they don’t do by mistake, that’s a that’s a really engaged hot audience. And so you can do things like that. But it’s not something that you can do all the time, I recommend waiting until you have a killer special or discount or something like that.

 

Steven

Fantastic. Well, so much information, but you organize it really well in terms of, kind of, starting out with structure, the campaign all the way through the anatomy of the ads themselves, retargeting audiences, and how you think about that. So Logan, thank you so much, what a wealth of information. And what we’re going to do is this is going to get out, this is going to help businesses or agencies that are dealing with this on a regular basis to make more out of those Facebook ads. Thanks for showing up.

 

Logan

Appreciate you having me.

 

Outro

What a wealth of information. I have rarely had it laid out that way in terms of just the structure of the ads to how you think about all the different variables with the creative. Well, no, if we don’t get the creative right, nothing else matters. But there’s so much inside of Facebook ad campaigns, if you don’t get it right. And so starting with the structure, and making sure that you’re addressing a prospecting audience versus a retargeting audience and not mixing those, huge. And then how you think about the most important elements of the creative and going about and testing those and then applying, you know, all different kinds of retargeting audiences. Wow, I got tons of notes. And I hope that really helped you. Logan, thank you very much. This has been a fantastic podcast.

 

As a small reminder to my incredible audience, please leave me a review and hit that subscribe button. Your support helps this podcast get into more ears. Thanks in advance.

 

Thanks for tuning in to the Facebook Sales Secrets podcast, where we have the industry’s brightest Facebook heroes bring you their latest ideas that you can use to skyrocket your Facebook marketing success. Please remember to subscribe and share this podcast with your friends. For more tips, please visit us at LeadKlozer.com/podcast that’s Lead Closer with a K. See you next week.

 

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